• John Timothy Robinson

John Timothy Robinson, one poem


Fury

The canvas is a fury of discipline,

a pentimenti of empty space

where indiscernible images lie beneath.

That change of mind

leads eyes to one radiant face at mid-ground.

Red lips lure toward other features

where shades of gold and orange

bathe face and neck.

Deep, blue contours highlight cheeks,

draw eyes into offset eyes

where blue swirls twirl into infinity.

The illusion of a right ear allows

hearing this new song soar up

through fired tendrils of hair,

crazy in that kiss of the artist’s eyes.

Strands of burgundy blend with bronze

trailing from a sunrise of the forehead.

A green vine intertwines that blazing color-burst

where Amaranth blooms amid the flurry.

John Timothy Robinson is a traditional citizen and graduate of the Marshall University Creative Writing program in Huntington, West Virginia with a Regent’s Degree. He has an interest in Critical Theory of poetry and American Formalism. John is also a twelve-year educator for Mason County Schools in Mason County, WV. He strives for a poetics similar to Donald Hall, Maxine Kumin, James Wright, Louis Simpson, Gallway Kinnell and Robert Bly though enjoys learning from intrinsic poets and their theories in the critical writings of Denise Levertov, Robert Creeley, Louis Zukofsky, William Carlos Williams and Richard Kostelanetz. John is currently working on a creative dissertation in contemporary poetry, though outside the university environment. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in numerous journals.


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