• Timothy Gager

"Existential Crisis"


Hitting a snooze button

an archaic term, like hanging up or

alack, alee, alow, amain, anent, anon

Freaking-A, Lord, gramercy.

Torturing the dog in order

to trim his nails

buying and applying eye cream,

writing vomit describing cat shit

to my wife, contributing nothing

to anything-but what it is worth

contributing to? The Salvation Army, maybe,

I’m angry over the dangling preposition

like ringing a bell, having one’s bell rung,

causing alarm with much confusion,

over mass confusion…of causation,

certes, clepe, eft, egads, e.e..

Spreading Like Wild Flowers is his eighth collection of poetry. Timothy hosted the successful Dire Literary Series in Cambridge, Massachusetts from 2001 to 2018 and was the co-founder of The Somerville News Writers Festival. He has had over 600 works of fiction and poetry published, of which fifteen have been nominated for the Pushcart Prize. His work has been read on National Public Radio. His work also has been nominated for a Massachusetts Book Award, The Best of the Web, and The Best Small Fictions Anthology.

Timothy is the Fiction Editor of The Wilderness House Literary Review, and the founding co-editor of The Heat City Literary Review. A graduate of the University of Delaware, Timothy lives in Dedham, Massachusetts with some fish and two rabbits, and he is employed as a social worker. He is currently seeking representation for his third novel, Joe the Salamander.


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