A review of Flowers, All Sorts in Blossom. Figs, Berries and Fruits Forgotten By Oisin Breen

By James Bourey



Flowers, All Sorts in Blossom. Figs, Berries and Fruits Forgotten

By Oisin Breen

Publisher: Hybrid Press

Edinburgh, Scotland, UK


If you’re a casual reader of poetry with little patience for words that are challenging, verses with lines that sometimes seem tangled or long sections that feel Joycean, then you may be tempted to avoid this book. But you’ll be missing some very good work from Irish poet Oisin Breen who invokes incantations to explore grief and the emotional complexities of loss.


Even the title of this book is intriguing. The imagination could easily shape the title into a poem:


Flowers,

all sorts

in blossom.


Figs, berries

and fruits

forgotten.


A poem it is; simple lines and direct, yet there is a weight and a beauty that is very reminiscent of lines from the Asian masters. Mr. Breen writes with a depth of experience and in the tradition of Celtic storytellers. But this author moves around a little more than one who is completely grounded in a native tradition.


There are three extensive sections in this collection, with numbered poems of varying length and complexity. The first section is titled with a question, placed upon the page as a poem;